Although the immigration laws of the United States have not changed, the interpretation and enforcement of those laws have become stricter, making it more important than ever for immigrants to stay on the right side of the law. Just one small mistake can lead to a ton of trouble and may even result in deportation. It is vital for those who want to remain in the U.S. to understand everything that is required of them when it comes to the criminal laws and the immigration laws of the U.S.

The paperwork, requirements and all the steps involved can be intimidating, especially if you’re not fluent in the language. The attorneys at HAWM Law have extensive experience, and knowledge of the ins and outs of the U.S immigration legal system.

Be Ready for the Unexpected

Any application process takes time, especially those dealing with immigration. With all the changes in the immigration system, this can be longer than you may anticipate. Being prepared for delays can prevent disappointment or stumbling blocks.

Plan ahead, if you need to renew proof of your status or work permit. Depending on the application you are submitting, you may apply either 90 or 180 days before your card expires.

To avoid delays, an immigration attorney can help make sure your application is successfully prepared.

Knowledge is Power

If you have a visa, violating it can mean trouble. Make sure you understand and carefully abide by the restrictions and limitations of your visa. A violation, no matter how minor, can lead to the revocation of your visa and possible deportation. The government has implemented a new 90 day fraudulent intent rule. Therefore, if you attempt to change your status (e.g. tourist to green card based on marriage) within 90 days of entering the US, you may encounter problems with immigration based on the type of visa you held and your intent to violate the terms of that visa at the time of entry.

Notify USCIS if you Move

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) requires:

Most non-U.S. citizens must report a change of address within 10 days of moving within the United States or its territories. Exceptions include: Diplomats (visa status A), Official government representatives to an international organization (visa status G), Certain nonimmigrants who do not possess a visa and who are in the U.S. for less than 30 days.

Be on Time for Appointments

Showing up late for an appointment with the United States immigration court, consulate, embassy, or the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, can have dire consequences. Make sure you are there early or on time. Never miss any immigration court proceedings as failure to appear may result in a deportation order being entered against you.

Get Help or Your Questions Answered

If you live in the Central Florida area and need assistance, contact the experienced immigration attorneys at HAWM Law. We handle all areas of immigration law. Whether you or a loved one is facing the urgency of potential deportation, the long wait for a visa, pursuing a green card, citizenship or you have a small to medium size business entity and are seeking these benefits for your employees, we will evaluate your immigration case and help navigate you through the immigration process from start to finish.

Contact HAWM Law Today for a Free Consultation

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